Hubble-telescoop maakt fascinerende foto van botsende sterrenstelsels

redactie 15 mrt 2019 Entertainment

De Hubble-telescoop heeft ons al heel wat prachtige kiekjes opgeleverd en voegt daar nu een foto van twee sterrenstelsels in botsing aan toe. De indrukwekkende foto laat zien hoe de twee stelsels langzaam in elkaar draaien. Het fenomeen vindt plaats op 240 miljoen lichtjaar afstand in het Hercules sterrenbeeld, zo meldt NASA.

Hubble

Dankzij de beroemde astronoom William Herschel wisten we al sinds 1784 van het bestaan van de galaxies af. Er werd altijd gedacht dat het slechts één stelsel was maar recentelijk werd ontdekt dat het dus twee botsende sterrenstelsels zijn.

Weinig gevaar op botsingen

Miljarden jaren geleden werden de stelsels door elkaars zwaartekracht naar elkaar toegetrokken waardoor het er nu een chaotische bedoening is. Door de gigantische schaal van onze kosmos is het echter extreem zeldzaam dat sterren ook daadwerkelijk tegen elkaar aan botsen. Er is meer dan genoeg ruimte om langzaam in elkaar te draaien en uiteindelijk een harmonieus geheel te vormen. De Melkweg gaat over vier miljard jaar hetzelfde proces doormaken. Onze eigen sterrenstelsel botst dan met de Andromedanevel.

Bonus: zeven eye-candy foto’s die de Hubble-telescoop eerder maakte

Volg je ook al de Instagram-account van NASA en de Hubble telescoop? Wat een aanraders zijn dat zeg! Wie niet beter weet zou denken dat al die foto’s met Photoshop zijn gemaakt. Onze alledaagse probleempjes op onze aardkloot verbleken in vergelijking met de immense taferelen die op heel veel lichtjaren afstand plaatsvinden:

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#HubbleClassic This is a mosaic image, one of the largest ever taken by Hubble of the Crab Nebula, a six-light-year-wide expanding remnant of a star's supernova explosion. Japanese and Chinese astronomers recorded this violent event nearly 1,000 years ago in 1054, as did, almost certainly, Native Americans. The orange filaments are the tattered remains of the star and consist mostly of hydrogen. The rapidly spinning neutron star embedded in the center of the nebula is the dynamo powering the nebula's eerie interior bluish glow. The blue light comes from electrons whirling at nearly the speed of light around magnetic field lines from the neutron star. The neutron star, like a lighthouse, ejects twin beams of radiation that appear to pulse 30 times a second due to the neutron star's rotation. A neutron star is the crushed ultra-dense core of the exploded star. The Crab Nebula derived its name from its appearance in a drawing made by Irish astronomer Lord Rosse in 1844, using a 36-inch telescope. When viewed by Hubble, as well as by large ground-based telescopes such as the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, the Crab Nebula takes on a more detailed appearance that yields clues into the spectacular demise of a star, 6,500 light-years away. For more information on Hubble, follow the link in our bio. Credits: NASA, ESA, J. Hester and A. Loll (Arizona State University) #NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos #crab #nebula #supernova #neutronstar #star

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This illustration shows a neutron star (RX J0806.4-4123) with a disk of warm dust that produces an infrared signature as detected by Hubble. The disk wasn’t directly photographed, but one way to explain the data is by hypothesizing a disk structure that could be 18 billion miles across. The disk would be made up of material falling back onto the neutron star after the supernova explosion that created the stellar remnant. Neutron stars are among the strangest objects in the universe. Neutron stars are a case of extreme physics produced by the unforgiving force of gravity. The entire core of an exploded star has been squeezed into a solid ball of neutrons with the density of an atom’s nucleus. Neutron stars spin as fast as a blender on puree. Some spit out death-star beams of intense radiation — like interstellar lighthouses. These are called pulsars. These beams are normally seen in X-rays, gamma-rays, and radio waves. But astronomers used Hubble's near-infrared (IR) vision to look at a nearby neutron star cataloged RX J0806.4-4123. They were surprised to see a gush of IR light coming from a region around the neutron star. That infrared light might come from a circumstellar disk 18 billion miles across. Another idea is that a wind of subatomic particles from the pulsar’s magnetic field is slamming into interstellar gas. Hubble's IR vision opens a new window into understanding how these "infernal machines" work. For more information, follow the link in our bio. Credits: NASA, ESA, and B. Posselt (Pennsylania State University) #NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos #neutronstar #infrared #supernova #pulsar #physics

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Astronomers have been pointing telescopes at the Whirlpool Galaxy and marveling at its spiral arms for centuries, even before they knew it was a galaxy (when people called it a spiral nebula). When Hubble captured this image in 2005, it was the sharpest image of the Whirlpool ever taken. The galaxy and its smaller companion can be spotted even with backyard telescopes, hanging just below the handle of the Big Dipper. For more information on Hubble, head to nasa.gov/hubble Credits: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) #NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos #HubbleClassic #whirlpool #galaxy #BigDipper

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It's #NationalCameraDay! Hubble has many cameras that help it observe the universe, including the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). ACS was installed on Hubble in 2002 and has taken many of Hubble's iconic images. For more about this image, visit nasa.gov/Hubble Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) – ESA/Hubble Collaboration #NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos

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#HubbleClassic This colorful collection of 100,000 stars includes red giants, blue stragglers, white dwarfs & yellow Sun-like stars in the giant Omega Centauri star cluster. This image was one of the first taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 after being installed during Servicing Mission 4, which wrapped up 9 years ago this week. For the latest and greatest on Hubble, head to nasa.gov/hubble Credits: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team #NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos #star #cluster

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#HubbleClassic As spring arrives in the Northern Hemisphere, so too come butterflies. In July 2009, Hubble caught this celestial butterfly 3,800 light-years away in the constellation Scorpius. Known to astronomers as NGC 6302, it is a planetary nebula, made of gas and dust expelled by a dying Sun-like star. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team #NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos #butterfly #nebula #spring

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This Hubble image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy hunter William Herschel in 1784, NGC 7331 is located about 45 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (the Winged Horse). Facing us partially edge-on, the galaxy showcases its beautiful arms, which swirl like a whirlpool around its bright central region. Astronomers took this image using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, as they were observing an extraordinary exploding star — a supernova — near the galaxy’s central yellow core. Named SN 2014C, it rapidly evolved from a supernova containing very little hydrogen to one that is hydrogen-rich — in just one year. This rarely observed metamorphosis was luminous at high energies and provides unique insight into the poorly understood final phases of massive stars. NGC 7331 is similar in size, shape and mass to the Milky Way. It also has a comparable star formation rate, hosts a similar number of stars, has a central supermassive black hole and comparable spiral arms. The primary difference between this galaxy and our own is that NGC 7331 is an unbarred spiral galaxy — it lacks a “bar” of stars, gas and dust cutting through its nucleus, as we see in the Milky Way. Its central bulge also displays a quirky and unusual rotation pattern, spinning in the opposite direction to the galactic disk itself. By studying similar galaxies we hold a scientific mirror up to our own, allowing us to build a better understanding of our galactic environment, which we cannot always observe, and of galactic behavior and evolution as a whole. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA/D. Milisavljevic (Purdue University) #NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos #HubbleFriday #galaxy #pegasus #whirlpool #supernova #evolution

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Hubble-telescoop maakt fascinerende foto van botsende sterrenstelsels
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